Twitter does not a revolution make

Solidari.tv
Just finished an updated version of solidari.tv. Check it out, use it to share media, organise and act.

Because that’s what media is good for, informing us and arming us. But it means nothing unless we turn that into action.

That’s the hard bit.

What’s been happening in Tunisia is not the result of Wikileaks or of Twitter. It’s the fruits of a struggle that has its roots in a pre-internet era.

Dictatorship and authoritarianism breed resistance and the Tunisian people have been building to this moment since Ben Ali first took power, 23 years ago.

I’m not Tunisian, but as an Iranian I can say that there are few things more offensive than some American in Silicon Valley taking credit for a struggle that their government has spent decades on the wrong side of.

Just because you’re watching it on your screen doesn’t mean you made it happen. Mohamed and Neda did.

But to deny a place in political struggle for new media would be unfair.

Media builds communities, and new media gives us the opportunity to make our own communities, free of the noxious agendas of the Rupert Murdochs of this world.

It is this we must celebrate and find ways to exploit and use.

But the end point has to be action in the physical world.

Because real power doesn’t confront you online. Hammers and fists don’t do double clicks.

#sidibouzid

2 Responses to “Twitter does not a revolution make”


  • “I’m not Tunisian, but as an Iranian I can say that there are few things more offensive than some American in Silicon Valley taking credit for a struggle that their government has spent decades on the wrong side of.”

    THANK YOU!

  • Social media is a great place to mobilize, but we will need better tools if we really want to also have political debates online. And we should never forget the local level!

    Research about “open source democracy promotion”: http://www.cloudtostreet.org/
    Crowdsoursing tool (still in development): http://echo.to/en

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